Poem in GUD Magazine

GUD Issue 7 CoverI have a poem in the new issue of GUD (Greatest Uncommon Denominator) Magazine. It’s called “Monkey Bait”, and is inspired by the story of how the jellyfish lost its bones.

This is an odd announcement for me, as I stopped writing poetry years ago. There were a lot of delays with the magazine, which is why this poem is surfacing now. Some might recognise that it was also in my collection, as the exclusivity part of the contract with GUD was waived some time back.

I’ve always liked poetry, but never really in the way the current market likes poetry. I like writing poems about ideas I find neat. They might be serious sometimes, but they’re not linked to serious issues in the real world. Neat idea poetry tends to get flatly rejected (sometimes with strained “this isn’t the direction we’re going in” messages). So there’s always that pressure to be more meaningful and make it relate somehow to a real world issue, even if it’s a poem about robots.

Added to that, poems don’t have space to clarify what they’re about. That’s much more of an issue when it is about a real world thing. It’s more likely to hurt someone, which is exactly what happened when I tried to write poetry that was better suited to the market. That poem was a science fiction scenario with some things based on my own experiences, but there wasn’t really space to make that clear, so that wasn’t how the poem was taken.

That “Monkey Bait” is my last published one is fitting in a way, as it wasn’t a market-pleaser. There isn’t a hidden metaphor here for anything else. Just a different take on the theme of the original tale. I won’t say I’ll never write another poem, but it’s not something I have plans to do. In the meantime, I hope GUD readers enjoy my take on the story.

My First Poem: Pigeons

One of my first poems was uncovered in a recent clearout. I was probably about six when I wrote this. As you can see, I already had the idea of non-rhyming poetry. Sort of.

An untitled poem about pigeons (click for fullsize):

Pigeon Poem

On the back, more pigeons:

More Pigeons

What it says:

I like pigeois do you?
flying in a vaes. my mum
like pigeois do you? evey pigeoi like
pigeois

For extra hilarity, note that the teacher corrected the last instance of ‘pigeoi’ by adding an s to make it a plural. The rest was apparently okay.

Translated into English:

I like pigeons, do you?
Flying in a flock. My mum
likes pigeons, do you? Every pigeon likes
pigeons!

I didn’t know what an exclamation mark was, but if I had, I’d have used one. Vaes really does mean flock. When confronted with a word I couldn’t spell, anything could happen.

I hope you like pigeons too!